Emergencies


IF YOU EXPERIENCE A DENTAL EMERGENCY PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE AT 678.365.4889. IF IT IS AFTER-HOURS, OUR ON-CALL STAFF MEMBER WILL BE ABLE TO ASSIST YOU.

Oozing: Intermittent bleeding or oozing overnight is normal. Bleeding may be controlled by placing fresh gauze over the areas and biting on the gauze for 30-45 minutes at a time.

Persistent Bleeding: Bleeding should never be severe. If so, it usually means that the packs are being clenched between teeth only and are not exerting pressure on the extraction areas. Try repositioning the packs. If bleeding persists or becomes heavy you may substitute a tea bag (soaked in very hot water, squeezed damp-dry and wrapped in a moist gauze) for 20 or 30 minutes. If bleeding remains uncontrolled, please call our office.

Swelling: Swelling is often associated with oral dental procedures. It can be minimized by using a cold pack, ice bag or a bag of frozen peas wrapped in a towel and applied firmly to the cheek adjacent to the extraction area. This should be applied 20 minutes on and 20 minutes off during the first 24 hours after the extraction. If you have been prescribed medicine to control swelling, be sure to take it as directed.

Pain: Unfortunately dental procedures can be accompanied by some degree of discomfort. You will usually have a prescription for pain medication. If you take the first pill before the anesthetic has worn off, you should be able to manage any discomfort better. Some patients find that stronger pain medicine causes nausea, but if you precede each pain pill with a small amount of food, chances for nausea will be reduced. The effects of pain medications vary widely among individuals. If you do not achieve adequate relief at first, you may supplement each pain pill with an analgesic such as aspirin or ibuprofen. Some patients may even require two of the pain pills at one time. Remember that the most severe pain is usually within six hours after the local anesthetic wears off; after that your need for medicine should lessen. If you find you are taking large amounts of pain medicine at frequent intervals, please call our office. If you anticipate needing more prescription medication for the weekend, we appreciate your making every effort to call for a refill during weekday business hours. In the unlikely situation that you need a prescription over the weekend, please call our emergency number.

Nausea: Nausea is not uncommon after an extraction. Sometimes pain medications are the cause. Nausea can be reduced by preceding each pain pill with a small amount of soft food, and taking the pill with a large volume of water. Try to keep taking clear fluids and minimize dosing of pain medications, but call us if you do not feel better. Classic Coca Cola may help with nausea.

What To Do In Case of Emergency

IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY, PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICES.
678-365-4889

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF MY CHILD FALLS AND KNOCKS OUT A PERMANENT TOOTH?

Remain calm. Locate the tooth and pick it up by the chewing surface, being careful not to touch the root.

If the tooth is not dirty or broken, you should attempt to reinsert it into your child’s mouth into the empty socket. If you are able to reinsert it, have your child hold the tooth in place by biting on a clean piece of cloth or gauze and go directly to you pediatric dentist. If you cannot reinsert the tooth (or if it is dirty or broken), put the tooth in a glass of milk and take it and your child immediately to your dentist’s office.

CHIPPED OR BROKEN TOOTH

Even if the damaged tooth is not a permanent one, it is important to go immediately to the dentist office. Once a tooth has become chipped or broken, bacteria can enter the tooth’s pulp or nerve and cause an infection. It is important for a dentist to evaluate the damage and seal the enamel to keep bacteria out and ward off infection. If you are able to locate the piece of broken tooth, put it in a glass of milk and bring it with you to your pediatric dentist. In some cases, the broken piece can be reattached in the office.

  • Apply direct pressure on the bleeding area using a clean cloth.
  • If there is swelling, use a cold compress to reduce the swelling (a Popsicle often works well).
  • Give your child an appropriate dose of Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen.

CUT/BITTEN TONGUE, LIP OR CHEEK

A cut or bitten tongue, lip or cheek can lead to bleeding, swelling and discomfort. To relieve these symptoms, first apply direct pressure to the wound to stop the bleeding. If there is swelling, you can reduce it by applying a cold compress. (A popsicle works well.) Finally, give your child Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen for any discomfort.

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